Discover Careers in Law!

INTRODUCTION

Lawyers, judges, police officers, etc. TV and movies have certainly given us a good idea about different legal careers.

But what does a notary do? What schooling do bailiffs need? What skills are important for legal translators

Éducaloi’s Careers Section explains the ins and outs of 15 careers in law.

EDUCATION

Some careers in law are open to you right after high school, some after CEGEP and others only after university.

But for most careers, you’ll probably need some special training. For example, to become a police officer in Quebec you need special training at the École nationale de police (Quebec police academy) after getting your Diploma of College Studies (DEC) in Police Technology.

The education requirements for most of these careers are very specific. For example, you need a master’s degree in notarial law to become a notary.

The career fact sheets on this website clearly explain the education you need.

Careers You Can Enter After High School and Some Special Training

Legal Secretary

Correctional Officer (for the federal government)

Court Usher

Police Officer (Royal Canadian Mounted Police)

 

Careers That Require a CEGEP Diploma

Correctional Officer (for the provincial government)

Court Clerk

Bailiff

Legal Interpreter

Police Officer (Quebec police force)

Official Stenographer

Paralegal

 

Careers That Require a University Degree

Probation Officer

Lawyer

Bailiff

Legal Interpreter

Judge

Notary

Legal Translator

Social Worker

ROLE

Careers in law can be divided into four main groups according to their role in society.

Inform and Advise

Lawyer
Notary
Social Worker

Protect

Bailiff
Correctional Officer
Police Officer
Probation Officer

Help the Legal System Run Smoothly

Court Clerk
Court Usher
Legal Interpreter
Legal Secretary
Legal Translator
Official Stenographer
Paralegal

Decide

Judge

IN COURT

You can find people doing legal jobs throughout the community: on the street, in schools, in big companies, in government offices, etc.  

But many of these people work in court. Éducaloi’s career fact sheets explain the details of these careers.