Renewing or Ending a Lease: Practical Information

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Most apartment or housing leases in Quebec end on June 30 of each year. Did you already get a letter from your landlord asking if you want to renew your lease? What should you do after you get the letter? What are your rights? What can you do if your landlord wants to take back (repossess) the apartment or evict you? What should you do if you want to leave your apartment at the end of the lease?

 

Rent Increase When You Renew Your Lease

Your landlord is allowed to increase your rent when you renew your lease. But she must send you a written notice of the increase. If your lease is for one year or more, she must send you the notice between three and six months before your lease ends. The notice must tell you what the new rent will be and how much time you have to accept or refuse the increase.

If you don't receive a notice, you're allowed to stay in your apartment on the same conditions as your old lease, with no increase in your rent.

You have one month to refuse the rent increase, and your refusal must be in writing. The website of the Régie du lodgement (rental board) has a form you can use.

  • If you don't reply to the notice of increase, this means you accept the increase.

If you send a letter to your landlord saying that you refuse the rent increase, she has one month to try to reach an agreement with you or ask the rental board to decide what the new rent will be. The law says that if the landlord doesn't answer your letter or doesn't apply to the rental board within one month, then the lease is renewed with the same rent and on the same conditions as your old lease.

To learn more, read our article Renewing a Residential Lease and Rent Increases.

 

Repossession and Eviction

Landlords have the right to repossess (take back) an apartment if they want to live in it or to allow members of their immediate family to move in. Landlords can also evict tenants, that is, require them to leave, if they want to do major work on the apartment, such as making it bigger or dividing it into smaller apartments.   

Whether the landlord wants to take back the apartment or to evict you, she has to send you a notice of repossession or eviction at least six months before the end of the lease if the lease is for six months or longer.

To learn what to do in this situation, read our article Repossession of an Apartment or Eviction.

 

What to Do if You Want to Leave  

As a tenant, you must respect your lease until it ends, except in very specific situations. If you want to leave your apartment at the end of the lease, you must let your landlord know between three and six months before the lease ends if the lease is for one year or longer. You also have to let possible tenants visit your apartment, starting as soon as you give your notice.

You can try to reach an agreement with your landlord if you want to move out earlier or later than the date stated in the lease. You can also assign your lease or sublet the apartment until the end of the lease.

To learn more, see our guide Tenants and Landlords: A Guide to Rental Housing.