Hunting and the Law

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Hunting as a sport is becoming increasingly popular in Quebec.  Even though the law says everyone has the right to hunt, there are lots of rules to follow!

 

Have the right documents.

You need a hunting licence that says what you’re allowed to hunt and when.   For example, a license to hunt White-tailed deer won’t let you hunt moose or small game.

To get a hunting license, you need a hunter’s certificate for the type of weapon you want to use, for example, a bow, crossbow or firearm such as a rifle or shotgun.  To get the certificate, you must pass a beginner’s hunting course and be 12 years or older.

To hunt with a firearm, you also must pass a firearms safety course. You also need the course to get a licence to buy and possess a firearm.

In Quebec, you must also register your firearm with the Service d’immatriculation des armes à feu (SAIF) (Québec’s firearm registration service). A firearm must be registered before you are in possession of it. If you bought a firearm before January 29, 2018, you have until January 29, 2019 to register it. Registering a firearm is free.

To learn more about registration, visit the SIAF website. For more information on the rules for firearms, visit the RCMP website.

 

Stay within the limits.

You can’t hunt just anything, anywhere, any time. Quebec is divided into different geographic zones with their own specific rules.  The rules say what you’re allowed to hunt, how many animals you can hunt, when hunting season starts and ends, etc.

You must also have permission from the owner of the property you’ll be hunting on.

To learn more, see the website of the department of forests, wildlife and parks.

 

Safety first 

There are many laws to keep hunting safe.  For example, in many areas you must wear a coloured safety vest.  Also, hunting at night or shooting an animal from a public road is usually not allowed.

If something goes wrong, a careless hunter could be sued or even charged with a crime.

Important !
This article explains in a general way the law that applies in Quebec. This article is not a legal opinion or legal advice. To find out the specific rules for your situation, consult a lawyer or notary.